The Block

I’ve hit it, the writer’s block. I’d love to scream, “Oh, whoa is me!” but that would get me no where and bore me to tears.  Personally, I find the block not so bad. It’s like your brain telling you a small vacation is in order. What I tend to find is the time lets me clear my mind and something even better than what I had planed sprouts up. This time I’m sure some poor reviews have hindered my flow–I should never read reviews :/–but either way my writing hiatus has begun. I think I’ll take this time to work and play a video game lol!

Adult Fiction Conventions Vs. Indie Book and Teen Book Conventions

I’m getting real tired of readers today thinking the way teen books, and e-books by the majority of indie-authors, are correct for adult reading. Seriously people, don’t assume that crap is correct and then read something actually written correctly, with correct conventions, grammar, and spelling, and think it is jacked up. Open up a print book and compare, most indie-authors are trying to write correctly but according to the way major publishing companies edit manuscripts, these e-books are all messed up, and teen books fall in a completely different set of conventional standards since young readers don’t have the ability to read more complex text yet. These indie and teen authors are flooding the market with these books and in turn are changing the way adult readers think books should be written.

Examples:

People would think this is correct – 

I heard a knock at the door so I walked to it and opened it to see my friend Kyle waiting for me.

THIS IS WRONG PEOPLE!!!

CORRECT –

There was a knock at the door, drawing my attention away from my readings. Standing up, I went to it to discover my friend Kyle waiting on the other side.

I see this too often. The top one would be fine for a teen book, like maybe 5th grade reading, but the bottom is how adult books should sound.

Here is an example of dialogue done wrong and right:

Wrong:  “No,” I shoved him back a few steps, “I’m not going with you!”

Right:  “No” —my hands hit his chest, shoving him back a few feet— “I’m not going with you!”

In that example, nearly ALL indie authors don’t know how to use the em dashes to add action to dialogue. 

People, before you leave reviews, or blog about books, be sure you know if they are written correctly or not. Don’t read tons of indie books that are not edited by CMS or teen books and then read a correctly formatted adult book and think it is jacked up. 

As an indie author, I don’t quibble too much when I read bad conventions in indie books, I get it, I used to do the same thing. If you read my early books they are poorly edited–something I’m in the process of fixing. But I won’t leave a review saying it is correct, I will leave high stars, kind remarks to the story, and add, “With some editing this would be perfect.” That is it, that way others know it is a good story, but not correctly edited. It would be nice if all e-book readers and adults who read teen books knew the difference when they read a correctly formatted adult book so that they too could leave educated reviews and suggestions for books.

Ugh… Why do I do this to myself?

Okay, so if I see a title to a book that consists of 25 words–yeah, 25–I know I shouldn’t even look at the sample because it’s going to get my back up. As an author, I try to stay positive, leave only good reviews, but sometimes… Sometimes, it’s like the author is just asking to be torn apart. I’m happy to say I didn’t do it this time. *pats on the back all around* But, why do I even do it to myself? Why do I bother to click on it when the title alone says, “I’m a huge pile of crap!”? It boggles my mind. I’ve been lucky at times, where I went in apprehensive and found a gem of a story. Its my fault though, the Bigfoot related title, and the odd image, and the fact the title alone was more words than needed, all sucked me in like an addict seeking out their due punishment. What killed me most in this “book” was this:

8===D ~~~~ ({})

…yeah, you know what that is? It’s a dick jizzing in a pussy (excuse my language) and that is what the author put as her breaking symbol between the legal stuff and the beginning of the book. You know, that thing that normally looks like this ~ or this *** she did THAT! *SMH* 

I wish I could say lesson learned, but I know that would be a lie. Some other crap looking thing is going to suck me only to make me go, WTF!? and I will skim it and then try with all my might not to leave a poor review, because I don’t need that kind of book Karma.

Oh well, I’m not a fan of pregnancy milk sharking lesbian erotica either, or elderly erotica, but I’m sure plenty of people out there likes both of those, so to each their own.